Esports
Esports

ESIC Aims To Champion Integrity Of eSports

ESIC Aims To Champion Integrity Of eSports

As if perfectly timed, the ESIC - or the eSports Integrity Coalition - has today launched with intentions to be the "recognised guardian of the sporting integrity of esports and to take responsibility for disruption, prevention, investigation and prosecution of all forms of cheating". Alongside a bevy of big name support - including the likes of ESL, DreamHack and Intel - ESIC is a new organisation from a range of associated figures intending to stabilise the admittedly rocky road that is eSports contracts and recognition. As much as it has grown over the years, eSports is still a fairly young industry and much of the standardisation that we see in sports has yet to make the move over to competitive gaming. ESIC seeks to set a degree of expectations for eSports players, including enforcing sanctions and battling corruption for any participant of the organisation. The ESIC website has a heap of information, rules and regulations that it intends to impart into the world of eSports, and if competitive gaming is to ever reach full legitimacy it absolutely needs such an institution to maintain and monitor the sport to ensure fairness across the board. The ESIC board is made up of four founding members: Ian Smith, a lawyer who had previously drafted anti-corruption regulations for English cricket; Anna Rozwandowicz, director of communications at ESL; Bryce Blum, a lawyer working primarily in the field of eSports and also a guest columnist for ESPN. In addition, ESIC;s Anti-Doping Advice and Liaison is Michele Verroken, a founding director of Sporting Integrity who has dealt with such issues before. Further legal advice comes from Sheridans lawyer Andrew Nixon. It's definitely worth checking out the website to acclimatise yourself to the organisation a bit more. It's definitely a good prospect for the industry, but it requires a wider acknowledgement not only from the players but the fans, tournament hosts and games publishers if it's to earn credibility. The organisation itself has no greater power over the current state of eSports, and can only begin to do so if it is given the opportunity by the industry as a whole. We certainly hope it does.