Gwent
Gwent
World

What We Want from Gwent in 2018

Thronebreaker looks amazing.
What We Want from Gwent in 2018
2017 saw Gwent leave closed beta, release hundreds of new cards and blast onto the Esports scene like a perfectly timed Aard sign. Thousands of players have flocked to what’s becoming one of the most unique CCG’s on the market. Its success has also been recognised at the Global Game Awards, where it picked up the gong for Best Free to Play game. With all these accomplishments under its belt, it’s going to be hard to top 2017. But we’re sure CD Projekt Red have a few tricks up their sleeves and, if not, we have a few suggestions to kick start Gwenty-18.

Satellite Qualifiers

[caption id="attachment_100125" align="aligncenter" width="600"]freddybabes.jpg Freddybabes, Challenger #2 Champion[/caption] The tournament/pro-ladder divide has caused many arguments within the community, but it’s safe to say that being at the top of the leaderboard doesn’t necessarily make you the best player. If it wasn’t for winning a Strivewire sponsored qualifier, Freddybabes wouldn’t have made it to Gwentslam #1. The young brit is a university student in his first semester and doesn’t have time to grind the pro-ladder to accumulate crown points, instead relying on his performance in tournaments. Thanks to his victory in Gwentslam #1, he made it to Gwent Open #2 by a small margin, which he went on to win and repeat his success in Challenger #2. Truedawn, a Gwent player with a Magic: the Gathering background, has been vocal on the subject of qualifiers and regularly brings it up when co-hosting the Tier-two podcast with Merchant and Petrify. Approaching him on the subject, Truedawn had this to say: “Competitive Gwent should feel accessible to everyone in the community even if they do not have any plans to become a professional player. The ability to keep the dream alive is one of the biggest reasons Magic: the Gathering's organized play scene is so popular and largely populated by people who are not professionals. “There are maybe 20 people right now who can realistically make a living off competitive Gwent. If our scene is solely populated by those people, it will not survive. Satellite tournaments similar to Magic GPs or PTQs would be a way for anyone to dive into competitive play and potentially live the dream of qualifying for large events like Gwent Challenger.”

Coinflip Balancing & Spy Nerfs

[caption id="attachment_100126" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Summoning Circle Bridge of Spies – Cards like Summoning Circle and Hym are creating a spy meta. Is it time to give them a rework?[/caption] Oh, yes, we’re going there! Gwent’s lack of mana system could be considered both its draw and flaw. The “coinflip” conundrum has haunted the game since release; players going first – therefore “losing” the flip – will always be at a disadvantage as their opponent will be one card up. Fortunately, each faction has a silver spy that is played on your opponent’s side while drawing you a card and “reversing” the coinflip. Unfortunately, your opponent may decide to counter with their own spy and you’ll be doomed to play a card down for the rest of the game. Ultimately, there’s no direct solution to the coinflip; going first in Gwent will always leave you at a disadvantage. In recent tournaments, we’ve seen CDPR introduce a revolving coin to prevent excessive losing streaks, but what about ladder play? Some have suggested giving the player going first a few points to get started as a way of preventing their early low-tempo plays from being overcome. But what if we were to rework silver spies so they worked like an additional leader ability? Only the player going first would be able to create and play their faction’s spy during the game. If they wanted to reverse the coinflip on turn one, they would be able to do that in exchange for giving their opponent a chunk of points. Summoning Circle could also be reworked to only copy loyal units and that would prevent excessive spy spamming. Somebody notify the CDPR balancing department, because we might be through the looking glass. It may not be a perfect solution, but it’s healthy to open the debate.

Thronebreaker

[caption id="attachment_100127" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Thronebreaker Leaked Gameplay: CDPR’s top-down style Gwent RPG. Coming Soonâ„¢[/caption] We can’t end this wish-list without talking about one of the most hyped expansions in recent years. Thronebreaker is set to be the campaign DLC of Gwent and, if CDPR’s past expansions to The Witcher 3 are anything to go by, it’s set to be crammed full of side-quests, collectables and enriching narrative. The story will follow Queen Meve, ruler of two Northern Realms, as she returns to the warpath on a quest of “destruction and revenge”. Leaked gameplay footage has revealed mechanics similar to Total War, where players are left to roam free to gather resources and recruit more soldiers. Naturally, all battles are resembled as a game of modified Gwent, because why wouldn’t they be? Thronebreaker was set to release last year but, not long before Christmas, CDPR announced a delay to “increase the campaign scope”. While we would love to get our hands on this expansion ASAP, we know it is in safe hands. After all, The Witcher 3 was delayed by over a year, and that went on to win over 200 awards. CDPR, we love and trust you, so take as much time as you need. But not too long, pretty please.